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Just Three Things – Cheering Up My Sunday

Here we go again with my formerly-regular Just Three Things. In case you’re unfamiliar with this, I write regularly about my short early morning wander down the garden, noticing three things of interest and three jobs that need to be tackled. Simple as that, followed by breakfast.

One

The polyanthus-type primroses are less prone to mould because flowers are held on a longer stem. They are also easier to dead-head without damaging foliage. This one is the first of my one hundred and seventy Autumn plug purchases to bloom. Plug plants are tiny, approximately half a centimetre. The package arrived from Jersey, via Northern Ireland. Long story.

Two

I like the moss that has gathered, because the stone certainly has not rolled. I also like the rough beside the smoothness of the pot. And finally I like the blend of colouring. Plants, pot and stone are just perfect together.

Three

In the glasshouse, the top shelves are now filled with seedlings, cuttings and other accessories. The sweet peas are on the next shelf down, and now they need to be supported as they are beginning to trail.

Just three things to be done:

  1. Support the sweet peas with a few sticks or dead fuchsia twigs.
  2. Fill the bird-feeders because there’s very cold weather on the way.
  3. I need to buy a new head for the hosepipe. This can be got at my local hardware store, but it is also in stock at the garden centre. I know where I’ll get it, and while I’m there I’m sure other things will be needed. Priority: urgent.

As per usual I returned indoors for shelter and sustenance. As is my habit, I write with gratitude for the benefits my garden brings me. As is also my habit, the three small jobs to be done are added to my short mental list. There was a time when these jobs were put on the long finger, but with time on my hands these days, I try to tackle them promptly. Wisely, I make a note not to notice glaringly obvious difficult jobs that are staring me in the face. That could lead to missed deadlines, leading to an unwillingness to repeat the process.

Three things I notice and three tasks to be done. Simple as pie, followed by breakfast.

Weather:

Cold 5°C and light rain at 8.20am. Due to turn much colder this evening. Snow and sub-zero temperatures likely ofer the coming days. Spring, my ar*e!

Pádraig.

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  1. theshrubqueen

    Love the stationary stone! I have Sweet Peas about that size in my garden. They may fry before they flower!?

    1. Pádraig

      Work to be done! If we grow them, we gotta nurture them.

  2. Violet

    5° c is that 41 degrees? Beautiful plants, moss and primroses Pad! I like the article you also wrote on the herb from native american natural herbal remedies.

    1. Pádraig

      Yes 41….for us that’s beginning to feel cold. Looks like colder weather on the way this week.
      I had fun doing some research for the herbal remedies. If I remember, that article was about previous pandemics throughout history.

  3. Sel Calderbank

    The mossy stone and pot with heather look lovely together. That’s a lot of polyanthus! Where do you put them all? Always interested in herbs, what article is Violet referring to?

    1. Pádraig

      See can you search my site using “Mexicans”…. If it doesn’t work, I’ll dig it out for you…. The article is somewhat different than you may think!
      I’ve planted most of the polyanthus in pots (story of my life!) but I’m noticing they need very good drainage so I lifted pots off ground with legs.

      1. Sel Calderbank

        I wasn’t expecting that! I’m a believer in the healing power of plants, so I do hope the Heucheras brought some relief to the afflicted! I will look upon my own Heucheras with newfound respect…PS Your article puts Covid into some historical context, and having recently read a book set in plague-ridden medieval times (Mantel’s The Mirror and the Light), I wonder sometimes…I think people were more fatalistic back then.

        1. Pádraig

          Yeah, it’s a bit different. At the time I learned a lot about history of pandemics.
          I suppose fatalism was stronger because science was non-existent? Terrible to be up against the unknown enemy.

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